American Pie by Don McLean : Significant Lines from the Song

American Pie by Don McLean : Significant Lines from the Song

American Pie by Don McLean, is a nostalgic reflection on the evolution of American culture and society from the 1950s through the 1970s, particularly focusing on the impact of music and significant events. It mourns the loss of innocence and idealism, often referred to as “the day the music died,” which symbolizes the tragic plane crash that killed Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, and J.P. Richardson. Throughout the song, there are references to various cultural and musical icons, as well as significant events, touching on themes of love, faith, loss, and societal change. The lyrics explore the disillusionment and longing for a simpler time, ultimately ending with a sense of hope for the future.

Here are some significant lines from the song “American Pie”:

1. I can still remember how that music used to make me smile.
2. But February made me shiver with every paper I’d deliver.
3. Bad news on the doorstep, I couldn’t take one more step.
4. The day the music died.
5. Drove my Chevy to the levee, but the levee was dry.
6. And them good ol’ boys were drinkin’ whiskey and rye.
7. This’ll be the day that I die.
8. Did you write the book of love?”
9. Can music save your mortal soul?
10. And can you teach me how to dance real slow?
11. With a pink carnation and a pickup truck.
12. Now, for ten years we’ve been on our own.
13. Oh, and while the king was looking down, the jester stole his thorny crown.
14. Eight miles high and fallin’ fast.

American Pie by Don McLean
American Pie by Don McLean

American Pie by Don McLean : This song sung by popular artist Don McLean, is a old popular English track, featured in the album “American Pie”. American Pie song was released on May 26, 1971.

American Pie Song Credits

Singer : Don McLean
Album : American Pie
Lyrics : Don McLean
Music : Ed Freeman
Label : United Artists Records